U.S. Urban Rail Transit Lines
Opened From 1980: A-H
publictransit.us
 
Compiled by Leroy W. Demery, Jr. • October 25, 2010
 
Copyright 2005-2010, Publictransit.us
Introduction
This tabulation includes all heavy rail transit (HRT), light rail transit (LRT), automated guideway transit (AGT) and monorail segments opened or closed in the United States from 1980. It was prepared as an update of a similar tabulation presented by Pushkarev, Zupan and Cumella (1982). Additional information, presented in Part 4, provides details of segments that are not grade separated (e.g. reserved track and street track).
The authors have added selected segments which were opened or closed prior to 1980. The authors have also added a companion tabulation covering urban rail transit in Canada and México (see "Urban Rail Transit in Canada and Mexico - Opening Dates").
The Federal Transit Administration (FTA), part of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT), maintains the National Transit Database (NTB). In general, the authors have adhered to NTD mode categories and classifications (as established by FTA) but have made certain exceptions. As we have discussed previously, it is not possible to group all of the world's urban and suburban railways into mutually-exclusive categories such as "tramway" (or "streetcar"), "light rail," "heavy rail" and "suburban rail" (or "commuter rail"). No such distinctions can be applied uniformly to all countries (see our Special Report No. 7, Rail Transit Systems Worldwide: Traffic Density & Related Statistics; scroll down to sections 5 through 8; pdf version is here). This is also true with reference to the U.S.
By administrative fiat, FTA labels several categories of urban rail transit systems using electric traction as "light rail," e.g. street tramways (or "streetcar" systems), "heritage" and "vintage" operations, and light rail transit. This label is applied whether a given system is long-established or not, whether the system has significant separation (e.g. tunnels, reserved track) or not, and whether the system is worked by "modern" rolling stock or not. (Long-established operations are sometimes referred to informally as "legacy" systems.)
The term "modern tramway" or ("modern streetcar") came into use from the early 2000s to describe lines using electric traction with characteristics distinct from "light rail" systems (see Comparison of Modern Streetcar vs. Light Rail Transit by the Tucson [Arizona, U.S.] Department of Transportation). In general, "modern tramway" lines are built to standards which preclude operation of full-scale "light rail" vehicles or trains (e.g. street track foundations excavated less deep than would be required to support the mass of light-rail vehicles). However, this practice is not "universal;" the Tacoma Link line was built with infrastructure suitable for operation of light-rail trains. Although not an "official" FTA category, the authors have used  "modern tramway" ("modern streetcar") for the purpose of this tabulation.
The authors have not used the terms "diesel light rail" and "diesel light rail vehicle," which came into use from the late 1990s. The definitions of "light rail" adopted by the Transportation Research Board, National Research Council (TRB) and the American Public Transportation Association (APTA, the U.S. trade organization of public transport operators) both stipulate electric traction.
(See Gray, B. h. (ed.). 1989. Urban Public Transportation Glossary. Washington, DC: Transportation Research Board, National Research Council. See also This Is Light Rail Transit, Transportation Research E-Circular Number E-C033, cosponsored by APTA and TRB; scroll down to Page 3.)
(See also Glossary of Transit Terminology, APTA; scroll down to "Rail, Light;" pdf version, dated 1994, is here; scroll down to "Rail, Light," Page 23.)
Some new U.S. rail systems have used diesel multiple unit (DMU) stock built by manufacturers such as Stadler, Siemens and Bombardier. Although used widely in Europe, such stock does not comply with passenger rail crashworthiness standards established and enforced by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), which is part of USDOT
(See Tyrell, David C. 2001. U.S. Rail Equipment Crashworthiness Standards. Cambridge (MA), US: Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, U.S. Department of Transportation.)
"Compliance" and "non-compliance" with FRA standards is an important planning and operating issue in the U.S., where use of "non-compliant" stock requires "temporal separation" from other rail traffic (e.g. operating hours for "non-compliant" passenger stock and other stock are limited to intervals that do not overlap). It is true that some services using "non-compliant" stock are marketed as "diesel light rail," but this label has not been used consistently. Furthermore "compliance" or "non-compliance" with FRA standards is obviously not an issue outside the U.S. For these reasons, the authors have used the term "Lightweight DMU" rather than "diesel light rail."
(The authors note that "temporal separation" rules exist for lines using electric traction that share tracks with goods (freight) trains, e.g. the San Diego LRT South Line.)
FTA no longer uses the mode category "Downtown Peoplemover" (DPM). These systems are classified as "AGT" The Jacksonville and Las Vegas monorails are also classified as "AGT," but the Seattle monorail is classified as "Monorail." The authors have not followed FTA practice, and have used the mode category "Monorail" for these three lines.
Sources consulted by the authors do not agree on the lengths of all segments or systems, because of differences in definition and other factors (e.g. rounding of segment lengths, confusion between "constructed length" and "operated length"). "Cumulative system length" statistics presented below may vary from total system length implied by NTD statistics.
"Cumulative system length" statistics include all rail transit operators serving the city, e.g. New York totals include New York City Transit (NYCT), Port Authority Trans-Hudson Corporation (PATH) and Staten Island Railway (SIRy). Each operator is counted once, and as a unit.
Memphis, New Orleans, Philadelphia (15-Girard Avenue) and San Francisco (F Line) operations with heritage rolling stock were included in "LRT" system length because of the scale of operation and levels of passenger traffic carried. Other dedicated heritage lines were excluded from "LRT" totals because of the limited scale of operation.
Additional information on heritage lines is available online. Sources include:
Information on the Morgantown Personal Rapid Transit System, which was completed prior to 1980, is available online. Sources include the Personal Rapid Transit (PRT) page of the Transportation and Parking Department, West Virginia University.
Information about the Seattle Center Monorail, which was completed prior to 1980, is available online. Sources include the Seattle Monorail Official Website.
Airport circulator systems and other "intramural transit systems" were excluded from this tabulation. Online sources include the following:
The authors have included all lines and segments known to be under construction, and selected lines and segments that were under design or in planning at the time of writing. In brief, lines and segments for which opening dates had been announced or which large shares of estimated construction cost had been secured were described as "Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning." This was not intended to provide a comprehensive list of all urban rail projects in planning. Such information is available online. Sources include The Transport Politic, APTA Heritage Trolley and Streetcar Site and North American Vintage Trolley Systems.
Line, station and stop names are those current at October 2010.
Except as noted, all HRT and LRT lines are standard gauge (1,435mm = 4' 8½").
Opening dates are the first day of commercial service. In some cases, service was offered without charge for a day or two prior to the formal start of commercial service (typically on the preceding Saturday and Sunday).
U.S. Urban Rail Segments Opened From 1980, Part 1 (A-H)
 
Atlanta (HRT 1979)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
1979
+(10.8) 6.7
East Line
Avondale – Georgia State
 
"
+(8.2) 5.1
West Line
Georgia State – Hamilton E. Holmes
(19.0) 11.8
1980 System Length
(19.0 km) 11.8 mi
1981
+(0.8) 0.5
South Line
Garnett – Five Points
 
"
+(2.3) 1.4
North Line
Five Points – North Avenue
(22.1) 13.7
1982
+(1.8) 1.1
"
North Avenue – Arts Center
(23.9) 14.8
"
+(2.3) 1.4
South Line
West End – Garnett
(26.1) 16.2
1984
+(4.4) 2.7
North Line
Arts Center – Lindbergh Center
 
"
+(5.5) 3.4
Northeast Line
Lindbergh Center – Brookhaven /
Oglethorpe University
 
"
+(4.2) 2.6
South Line
Lakewood / Fort McPherson
West End
(40.2) 24.9
1986
+(3.1) 1.9
"
East Point –
Lakewood / Fort McPherson
(42.7) 26.5
1987
+(4.4) 2.7
Northeast Line
Brookhaven / Oglethorpe University
– Chamblee
(47.1) 29.2
1988
+(4.2) 2.6
South Line
Airport – East Point
(51.3) 31.8
1992
+(3.2) 2.0
Northeast Line
Chamblee – Doraville
 
"
+(2.4) 1.5
Proctor Creek Branch
Ashby – Bankhead
(56.9) 35.3
1993
+(5.5) 3.4
East Line
Indian Creek – Avondale
(62.4) 38.7
1996
+(12.7) 7.9
North Line
Lindbergh Center – Dunwoody
(75.2) 46.6
2000
+(3.2) 2.0
Dunwoody – North Springs
(78.4) 48.6
 
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning - Modern Streetcar:
2012
+(4.2) 2.6
Atlanta Streetcar
Downtown Loop
Centennial Olympic Park –
Martin Luther King Historic Site
(4.2) 2.6
Notes: Five Points station opened 1981.
With the exception of the Atlanta Streetcar Downtown Loop, Atlanta had no rail transit expansion projects under construction or under design at 2010 October. However, the "Envision6 Regional Transportation Plan," prepared by the metropolitan planning organization (the Atlanta Regional Council), included the following transit projects:
High-Speed Bus Rapid Transit (BRT):
Interstate-75 North, Arts Center station – Marietta – Town Center (northwestward).
Interstate-20 West, Hamilton E. Holmes station Fulton Industrial Boulevard (westward).
Interstate-20 East, Downtown Atlanta (Garnett station) – Stonecrest Mall (southward and eastward).
Interstate-285 North, Cumberland Perimeter Center (eastward).
Arterial Bus Rapid Transit (BRT):
Memorial Drive, Kensington station – Goldsmith Road park-and-ride (eastward and northeastward), 8.1 km / 5.0 mi. Opened 2010 September 27.
Buford Highway, Lindbergh station – Pleasant Hill Road (northeastward).
Commuter rail: Atlanta – Jonesboro – Lovejoy, (42 km) 26 mi.
NOTE: The authors emphasize that the local share of financing for commuter rail has not been secured, and that significant political obstacles were raised at 2006 and 2007.
Light rail transit: BeltLine, peripheral line using railway alignments. Lindbergh Center station – Ponce de Leon – Edgewood – Inman Park-Reynoldstown station – Pryor – Rose Circle – West End station – Abernathy Boulevard – Ashby station – Hollowell – Northside – Peachtree Road – Lindbergh Center station. (35 km) 22 mi. Opening of initial segment planned for "between 2012 and 2015." Completion planned by "approximately 2030."
Modern Streetcar:
Atlanta Streetcar Peachtree Corridor, Five Points station (Downtown) – Arts Center station (Midtown). (10 km) 6 mi. Although promoted prior to the Downtown Loop, this line is now Phase 2 of the Atlanta Streetcar project.
Technology not specified: Lindbergh to Emory Spur. Lindbergh station – Emory University. Included in the Envision6 plan as a "light-rail technology placeholder."
 
Austin (Lightweight DMU 2010)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
2010
+(52) 32
Capital MetroRail
Downtown (Austin) – Leander
(52) 32
Note: Capital MetroRail opened 2010 March 22. Not electrified.
This line is described as "commuter rail" because service is operated only Monday - Friday, during morning and evening peak periods. However, in common with the RiverLINE between Camden and Trenton (q.v. below), it has a short segment of street track in the business center, operates over track shared with railway goods (freight) trains (with "temporal separation") and uses lightweight DMU stock built by Stadler (Switzerland). The operator plans to increase service from the beginning of 2011, including midday service.
 
Baltimore (HRT 1983, LRT 1992)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
HRT
 
1983
+(12.8) 8.0
Metro Subway Section A
Charles Center –
Reisterstown Plaza
(12.8) 8.0
1987
+(9.6) 6.0
"          "      Section B
Reisterstown Plaza – Owings Mills
(22.6) 14.0
1994
+(2.4) 1.5
"          "      Section C
Charles Center –
Johns Hopkins Hospital
(24.8) 15.5
LRT
1992
+(36.3) 22.5
Central Light Rail Line
Cromwell Station / Glen Burnie
– Timonium
(36.3) 22.5
1997
+(7.3) 4.5
Hunt Valley
Light Rail Extension
Timonium – Hunt Valley
 
"
+(0.5) 0.3
Pennsylvania Station
Light Rail Extension
University of Baltimore / Mt. Royal
 – Penn Station
 
"
+(4.4) 2.7
BWI Light Rail Extension
Linthicum – BWI Airport
(48.4) 30.0
Total HRT and LRT (at 2010)
(73.4 km) 45.5 mi
 
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning - LRT:
after 2016
+(23.5) 14.6
Red Line
Woodlawn –
Johns Hopkins Bayview Campus
(71.9) 44.6
Notes: "Baltimore Region Rail System Plan" adopted 2002.
The plan outlines construction of (106 km) 66 mi of new rail lines during a 40-year interval. The rail lines serving the Baltimore metropolitan area would have a total system length of (176 km) 109 mi (exclusive of commuter rail services). The six lines recommended:
Red Line, Interstate-70 – Social Security – West Baltimore – Charles Center – East Baltimore – Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center Campus – Dundalk – Turners Station. (34 km) 21 mi, all new.
Green Line, Owings Mills Charles Center Johns Hopkins Hospital – Madison Square – Morgan State University – Overlea – White Marsh – Middle River – Martin State Airport, with branch White Marsh – Interstate-95. Incorporates existing Metro Subway. Total system length (52 km) 32 mi, including new northeastward extension from Johns Hopkins station.
Blue Line, Cromwell Station / Glen Burnie – Linthicum – Camden Yards Camden Yards Lexington Market – University of Baltimore / Mount Royal – Penn Station – Lutherville – Timonium – Hunt Valley. Incorporates most (42 km / 26 mi) of existing Central Light Rail line. Total system length (42.5 km) 26.5 mi, including new connection to planned Yellow Line (below).
Yellow Line, Columbia – BWI Business District – Linthicum – Camden Yards – Penn Station – Lutherville – Hunt Valley; branch BWI Airport – Linthicum. Shares most of Blue Line (today's Central Light Rail Line, above). Total system length, (68 km) 42 mi, includes (23 km) 14 mi shared with Blue Line, new segment Columbia – Dorsey – Arundel Mills – BWI Amtrak – BWI Business District, and Camden Yards – Charles Center– Penn Station – Johns Hopkins University – Towson – Lutherville.
Purple Line, new urban rail service on Amtrak Northeast Corridor railway line, with up to five new stations. Odenton – BWI Amtrak – Halethorpe – West Baltimore – Penn Station – Madison Square – East Baltimore – Martin State Airport – Edgewood. Total system length (61 km) 38 mi.
Orange Line, new urban rail service on MARC Camden Line commuter rail corridor. Dorsey – Camden Yards. Total system length (18 km) 11 mi.
Priority corridors identified were: Red Line, Green Line segment Johns Hopkins Hospital – Morgan State University, (6 km) 4 mi, and Purple Line segment Madison Square – Martin State Airport. The report did not specify mode choices.
 
Boston (HRT 1901, LRT 1897)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
HRT
1971
+(7.1) 4.4
Red Line
South Shore Extension
JFK / Umass – Quincy Center
(46.3) 28.7
1975
-(4.0) 2.5
Orange Line
Charlestown Elevated
Haymarket – Everett
 
"
+(1.6) 1.0
Orange Line
Haymarket North tunnel
Haymarket
 – Community College
 
"
+(5.8) 3.6
Orange Line
Community College
 – Malden Center
(49.7) 30.8
1977
+(1.3) 0.8
Orange Line
Malden Center – Oak Grove
(51.0) 31.6
1980
+(4.8) 3.0
Red Line
South Shore Extension
Quincy Center – Braintree
(55.8) 34.6
1980 System Length
(55.8 km) 34.6 mi
1984
+(2.6) 1.6
Red Line
Northwest Extension
Harvard – Davis
(58.4) 36.2
1985
+(1.6) 1.0
"
Davis – Alewife
(60.0) 37.2
1987
-(7.4) 4.6
Orange Line
Washington Street Elevated
Chinatown – Forest Hills
 
"
+(7.9) 5.6
Orange Line
Southwest Corridor
Chinatown – Forest Hills
(61.6) 38.2
LRT
1980 System Length
(43.4 km) 26.9 mi
1985
-(4.0) 2.5 *
E-Arborway
Brigham Circle –Arborway
(39.4) 24.4
1989
+(1.0) 0.6 **
"
Brigham Circle –Heath Street
(40.3) 25.0
1994
***
A-Watertown
Brighton Avenue –Watertown
(40.3) 25.0
Total HRT and LRT (in operation)
(101.9 km) 63.2 mi
 
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning - HRT:
 
+(7.3) 4.5
Blue Line
Wonderland – Lynn
 
 
+(0.6) 0.4
Blue Line
Charles / MGH – Bowdoin
 
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning - LRT:
by 2015
+(8) 5
Green Line
Lechmere – Somerville;
branch to Union Square
 
Notes: Cumulative system length ("HRT," and "Total HRT and LRT"), and system length for the Red Line South Shore extension (opened 1969) adjusted to avoid duplication of parallel Red Line segments (Andrew – JFK / Umass – south), (3.5 km) 2.1 mi.
HRT: Start of construction of HRT Blue Line Wonderland – Lynn extension projected for 2017.
LRT: 1980 LRT system length includes (23.7 km) 14.7 mi of separated alignment, (15.6 km) 9.7 mi of reserved-track alignment and (4.0 km) 2.5 mi of in-street alignment, but excludes (3.2 km) 2.0 mi of in-street alignment operated by bus from 1969 (A-Watertown).
* Operation suspended.
** Operation restored.
*** Operation suspended 1969; closure made permanent 1994.
Restoration of (3.1 km) 1.9 mi of in-street alignment (E-Arborway) ordered in 2001 by Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The project was cancelled during 2008.
Ashmont-Mattapan LRT segment, (3.5 km) 2.2 mi, marketed as extension of HRT Red Line. Included in LRT totals.
Historic opening dates for in-street and reserved-track segments of LRT lines are presented in Part 4 (Appendices).
Urban Ring: Bus rapid transit (BRT) project, in planning. To extend Chelsea – Assembly Square – Sullivan Square – Lechmere – Kendall/MIT – Commonwealth Avenue / Boston University – Yawkey – Kenmore – Longwood Medical Area – Ruggles – Dudley Square – Broadway – World Trade Center – Logan International Airport – Airport station – Chelsea, (40 km) 25 mi, 36 stations.
To include operation in mixed traffic, in preferential lanes, and on fully-separated alignment. The line will include a tunnel ("Fenway - Longwood Medical Area Tunnel"), Yawkey – Ruggles, (2.4 km) 1.5 mi.
Start of construction planned for 2015. The line is planned for construction in three phases. During Phase 3, a rail line is planned for construction along the busiest segment of the corridor: Assembly Square – Sullivan Square – Lechmere – Kendall / MIT – Commonwealth Avenue / Boston University – Yawkey – Kenmore – Longwood Medical Area – Ruggles – Dudley Square, (14 km) 9 mi. This is planned for construction as a branch of either the LRT Green Line or the HRT Orange Line.
 
Buffalo (LRT 1984)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
1984
+(1.9) 1.2
Metro Rail
Erie Canal-Harbor –Theater
(1.9) 1.2
1985
+(5.2) 3.2
"
Theater – Amherst Street
(8.7) 5.4
1986
+(1.5) 0.9
"
Amherst Street – University
(10.0) 6.2
Note: System Length includes (1.9 km) 1.2 mi of reserved track (surface transit mall) and (8.2 km) 5.1 mi of separated (underground) alignment.
Additional (0.4 km) 0.2 mi of depot access line used for passenger service to “Special Events” station as required.
Buffalo had no rail transit expansion projects under construction, under design or in planning at 2010 October. Nor were any such projects contained in the Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) for 2008-2012, prepared by the metropolitan planning organization (the Greater Buffalo-Niagara Transportation Council).
 
Camden - Trenton (Lightweight DMU 2004)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
2004
(55.6) 34.5
River LINE
Camden (Entertainment Center)
– Trenton Transit Center
(55.6) 34.5
 
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning:
-
(2.1) 1.3
River LINE
Trenton Transit Center – State House
 
-
(8.1) 5.0
"
State House – West Trenton
 
by 2016
(29.8) 18.5
Glassboro-
Camden Line
Camden (Walter Rand Transportation Center)
Gloucester City – Woodbury – Glassboro
(85.5) 53.0
Note: River LINE opened 2004 March 14. Not electrified.
Most of line shared with goods (freight) trains (with "temporal separation").
The extension Trenton Transit Center – State House – West Trenton was not under active development at 2010 October.
See also Philadelphia.
 
Charlotte (LRT 2007, Modern Streetcar 2018)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
LRT
2007
(15.5) 9.6
Blue Line
South Corridor (LYNX)
I-485 (Pineville) – 6th Street
(15.5) 9.6
 
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning - LRT:
by 2015
(23) 14
Blue Line Extension /
 Northeast Corridor (LYNX)
6th Street – I-485/North Tryon
(39) 24
by 2026
 
LYNX Silver Line
Uptown/Gateway Station
 – CPCC Levine
 
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning - Modern Streetcar:
by 2018
 
Center City Corridor
(LYNX)
Rosa Parks Place
– Presbyterian Hospital
 
by 2023
 
"
Presbyterian Hospital –
Eastland Community Transit Center
 
by 2029
 
West Corridor (LYNX)
Charlotte Transit Center/Arena
 – Ashley
 
by 2034
 
"
Ashley – Airport
 
Note: Blue Line South Corridor opened 2007 November 26.
LYNX Silver Line planned for construction as bus rapid transit (BRT), (21.8 km) 13.5 mi, or LRT (20.5 km) 12.7 mi. Decision on technology planned during 2011.
Charlotte Streetcar Project (Center City Corridor), Rosa Parks Place – Eastland Community Transit Center, total segment length (16 km) 10 mi. Decisions about project staging and construction were pending at 2010 October.
The Charlotte Trolley, a heritage service, has a system length of (3.4 km) 2.1 mi. Most of this is shared by LRT trains but Trolley terminals are separate. Trolley service operates (0.3 km) 0.2 mi beyond the LYNX LRT 6th Street terminal, to 9th Street. Trolley terminal tracks at Atherton Mill parallel the LRT line for a short distance.
 
Chicago (HRT 1892)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
1964
+(7.9) 4.9
Yellow Line
Howard junction – Skokie
(116.6) 72.3
1969
+(1.0) 0.6
Green Line
Loomis – Ashland / 63rd
 
"
+(18.5) 11.5
Red Line
Tower 12 – 95th / Dan Ryan
(136.1) 84.4
1970
-(0.2) 0.1
Blue Line
Linden Place – Logan Square
 
"
+(8.2) 5.1
Blue Line
Linden Place – Jefferson Park
(144.2) 89.4
1980 System Length
(144.2 km) 89.4 mi
1982
-(1.0) 0.6
Green Line
University – Jackson Park
(143.2) 88.8
1983
+(8.7) 5.4
Blue Line
Jefferson Park – Rosemont
(151.9) 94.2
1984
+(4.0) 2.5
Blue Line
Rosemont – O'Hare Airport
(156.0) 96.7
1993
+(1.2) 0.8
Red Line
Howard – Dan Ryan connection *
 
"
+(14.8) 9.2
Orange Line
18th St. junction – Midway Airport
(172.1) 106.7
1994
-(0.7) 0.4
Green Line
East 63rd – Cottage Grove–University
(171.5) 106.3
2006
+(1.2) 0.8
Pink Line
Ashland – Polk
(172.7) 107.1
Notes: * 13th Interlocking – Cermak Junction.
System Length adjusted to avoid duplication of parallel Red Line and Brown Line segments (Armitage – Clark Junction), (2.8 km) 1.7 mi.
Today's Yellow Line was was built by the Chicago North Shore and Milwaukee Railroad ("North Shore Line") as the south segment of its Skokie Valley Line. The Chicago Rapid Transit Company ("CRT") worked a local service, Howard – Skokie (then named Dempster Street). This was marketed as the CRT Niles Center branch, and was opened on 1925 March 28. North Shore Line trains worked on this line from 1926 June 5. CRT successor Chicago Transit Authority withdrew its Niles Center service from 1948 March 26. The North Shore Line was closed on 1963 January 20 Thereafter, CTA restored service to Dempster Street on 1964 April 20. This service was marketed as "Skokie Swift." The seven intermediate stations once served by CRT Niles Center trains were not reopened.
Green Line (Lake – Englewood / Jackson Park) closed for reconstruction 1994-1996. East 63rd - Cottage Grove – Dorchester segment, (1.1 km) 0.7 mi, not reopened, removed 1997.
Most service on the Cermak (Douglas) branch of the Blue Line was rerouted to the business center (the "Loop"), via a newly-reconstructed segment known as the "Paulina Connector," from 2006 June 25. Pink Line service was started for a 180-day trial period and was later made permanent. The "Paulina Connector" was built in 1895. Its previous scheduled service was withdrawn from 1958 June 21.
Chicago had no rail transit expansion projects under construction or under design at 2010 January. However, the "2030 Regional Transportation Plan for Northeastern Illinois," prepared by the metropolitan planning organization (the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning), included the following:
Circle Line: Peripheral line west of the business center to permit operation of a new circular service. Ashland / Archer – 18th / Pilsen – Ashland / Lake – Division – North / Elston – North / Clybourn. Incorporates Paulina Connector, and includes (10.6 km) 6.6 mi of new line on viaduct ('L') and in tunnel ("subway").
Planned for construction in three phases. Phase I is the Paulina Connector. Phase II, connection between the Blue Line Cermak Branch (18th / Pilsen) and the Orange Line (Ashland / Archer). Phase III, connection between the Pink and Green lines (Ashland/Lake) and the Red Line (North / Clybourn).
Orange Line: Extension Midway – Ford City Mall, (3 km) 2 mi.
Yellow Line: Extension Skokie – Westfield Shoppingtown Old Orchard, (2.5 km) 1.5 mi.
Blue Line: Extension Forest Park – Oak Brook – Lombard (Yorktown Shopping Center, (21.4 km) 13.3 mi) – Lisle.
Long-standing plans for extension O'Hare – Schaumburg, (15.5 km) 9.5 mi, have been replaced by a suburban ("commuter") rail project (METRA STAR Line).
Red Line: 95th – 130th / Bishop Frd Freeway (10 km) 6 mi.
West Loop Transportation Center: New four-level underground tunnel below Clinton Street, with station adjacent to Union Station, (1.1 km) 0.7 mi. This would include a pedestrian mezzanine, a bus transitway, a rail-transit link and a suburban / intercity rail link. The rail transit link would connect the O'Hare and Forest Park branches of the 'L' Blue Line (below), permitting trains to serve Ogilvie Transportation Center and Union Station. The suburban / intercity rail link would provide a connection between Ogilvie Transportation Center and Union Station.
Mid-City Transitway: Not part of the regional transportation plan, but under study by the City of Chicago. Described as long-range concept for road or public transport. Planned for construction on alignment Belt Railway of Chicago. This was once planned as the alignment of the Crosstown Expressway, a project now cancelled.
Planned to extend Jefferson Park or Montrose station (Blue Line) – Cicero stations (Green, Blue and Pink lines) – Midway station (Orange Line) – 87th station (Red Line) in Cicero Avenue and 74th Street. Decision on configuration (bus-only, truck-only, rail rapid transit) to follow, during subsequent planning stages.
 
Cincinnati (Modern Streetcar 2013)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning:
2013
+(5.4) 3.4
Cincinnati Streetcar
The Banks – Cincinnati Zoo
(5.4) 3.4
 
Cleveland (HRT 1955, LRT 1920)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
HRT
1955
+(12.9) 8.0
Red Line
Louis Stokes Station at Windermere
– Tower City-Public Square
 
"
+(8.5) 5.3
"
Tower City-Public Square –
W.117th-Madison
(21.5) 13.3
1958
+(2.9) 1.8
"
W.117th-Madison – West Park
(24.4) 15.1
1968
+(6.8) 4.2
"
West Park –
Cleveland Hopkins International Airport
(31.1) 19.3
1980 System Length
(31.1 km) 19.3 mi
LRT
1980 System Length
(16.9 km) 10.5 mi
1996
+(3.5) 2.2
Waterfront Line
Tower City-Public Square – South Harbor
(20.5) 12.7
Total HRT and LRT
(51.6 km) 32.0 mi
Notes: 1980 LRT system length includes (5.5 km) 3.4 mi of separated alignment and (11.4 km) 7.1 mi of reserved-track alignment.
Construction of initial Red Line segment ("East Side line") started at 1928 by private capital. Construction suspended 1930; line described at this time as "several months from completion." Project resumed by Cleveland Transit System (municipal undertaking) from 1952.
Initial segment of Red Line (HRT) incorporates (4.2-km) 2.6-mi segment of LRT line, Tower City-Public Square – E. 55th, opened in stages during 1920-1930. This was rebuilt for joint working by HRT and LRT stock. Single-end (PCC-type) LRT stock required left-hand running on this segment. This segment was changed to right-hand running following purchase of new LRT stock and rehabilitation of LRT lines (completed 1981).
LRT system length excludes the (4.2-km) 2.6-mi segment worked jointly with Red Line HRT trains, described above.
Historic opening dates for LRT lines are presented in Part 4 (Appendices).
Cleveland had no rail transit expansion projects under construction, under design or in planning at 2010 October. Nor were any such projects contained in the regional transportation improvement plan (Connections 2030: A Framework for the 2030 Transportation System), prepared by the metropolitan planning organization (the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency).
 
Dallas (LRT 1996, Modern Streetcar 2015)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
1996
+(13.7) 8.5
+(2.9) 1.8
Red Line
Blue Line
Westmoreland – West End;
Illinois – 8th & Corinth
(16.6) 10.3
1997
+(4.0) 2.5
+(11.6) 7.2
Blue Line
Red Line
Ledbetter – Illinois;
West End – Park Lane
(32.2) 20.0
2001
+(5.5) 3.4
Blue Line
Mockingbird – White Rock
(37.7) 23.4
2002
+(5.6) 3.5
Blue Line
White Rock – LBJ / Skillman
 
"
+(15.0) 9.3
Red Line
Park Lane – Galatyn Park
 
"
+(6.6) 4.1
Blue Line
LBJ / Skillman –
Downtown Garland
 
"
+(5.1) 3.2
Red Line
Galatyn Park – Parker Road
(70.2) 43.5
2009
+(3.1) 1.2
Green Line (Northwest)
West End – Victory
 
"
+(4.4) 2.7
Green Line (Southeast)
Pearl – MLK Jr.
(76.5) 47.4
 
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning - LRT:
2010 Dec
+(11.9) 7.4
"
MLK – Buckner
(88.4) 54.8
"
+(4.5) 2.8
Green Line (Northwest)
Victory – Inwood
 
"
+(5.2) 3.2
"
Inwood –
Bachman (Northwest Highway)
 
"
+(7.9) 4.9
"
Bachman – Farmers Branch
 
"
+(8.9) 5.5
"
Farmers Branch –
North Carrollton / Frankford
(114.8) 71.2
2011 Dec
+(8.2) 5.1
Orange Line
(Northwest)
Bachman –
Las Colinas Urban Center
(123.1) 76.3
2012 Dec
+(6.6) 4.1
"
Las Colinas Urban Center –
Belt Line Road
 
"
+(14.4) 4.5
Blue Line (Northeast)
Downtown Garland –
Downtown Rowlett
(136.9) 84.9
2013 Dec
+(7.7) 4.8
Orange Line
(Northwest)
Belt Line Road – DFW Airport
(144.7) 89.7
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning - Modern Streetcar:
2015
+(2.4) 1.5
Downtown Dallas
Streetcar
Union Station –
Methodist Dallas Medical Center
(2.4) 1.5
Note: Green Line segments West End – Victory and Pearl – MLK Jr. opened 2009 September 14. (West End – Victory opened 2004 November 12 for special event service only.)
Opening of Green Line extensions to Buckner and North Carrollton / Frankford planned for 2010 December 6.
See also Denton.
 
Denton (Lightweight DMU 2011)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
2011
+(34) 21
A-train
Trinity Mills – Downtown Denton Transit Center
(34) 21
Note: A-train opening planned for 2011 June. Not electrified.
This line is described as "regional rail." It will connect with the Dallas (DART) LRT Green Line at Trinity Mills. Initial service will be operated by "RDC"-type DMU stock hired from Trinity Railway Express (Dallas-Fort Worth). New DMU stock built by Stadler is planned for delivery during 2012. Service planned for operation Monday - Friday, during morning and evening peak periods, with possible late evening service on Friday and Saturday.
In common with other lines using lightweight DMU stock, the A-train will share tracks with goods (freight) trains (with "temporal separation").
See also Dallas.
 
Denver (LRT 1994)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
1994
+(8.5) 5.3
Central Corridor
30th & Downing – I-25 & Broadway
(8.5) 5.3
2000
+(13.4) 8.3
Southwest Corridor
I-25 & Broadway
 – Littleton / Mineral
(21.9) 13.6
2002
+(2.9) 1.8
Platte Valley Spur
10th & Osage – Union Station
(24.8) 15.4
2006
+(31.1) 19.3
T-REX
(Southeast Corridor)
I-25 & Broadway – Lincoln;
Belleview – Nine Mile
(56.0) 34.7
 
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning:
2013
+(19.5) 12.1
West Corridor
Auraria West
 – JeffCo Government Center
(75.5) 46.8
2015
+(16.9) 10.5
I-225 Corridor
Nine Mile – Peoria / Smith
(92.4) 57.3
"
+(1.3) 0.8
Central Corridor
40th & 40th – 30th & Downing
(93.7) 58.1
2017
+(3.7) 2.3
Southeast Corridor
Lincoln – RidgeGate Parkway
(97.4) 60.4
"
+(4.0) 2.5
Southwest Corridor
Littleton / Mineral
– C-470 / Lucent Boulevard
(101.5) 62.9
Note: "T-REX" (Southeast Corridor) Project opened 2006 November 19.
 
Detroit (AGT 1987, LRT 2016)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
AGT
1987
+(4.7) 2.9
Detroit People Mover
Renaissance Center – Cadillac Center – Joe Louis Arena – Renaissance Center
(4.7) 2.9
 
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning - LRT:
 
+(5.5) 3.4
M-1 Rail Line
Hart Plaza – New Center
(5.5) 3.4
2016
+(9.5) 5.9
Woodward Rail
New Center – Eight Mile Road
(15.0) 9.3
Note: Detroit People Mover is a one-way loop; worked anti (counter)-clockwise.
LRT: M-1 Rail project promoted from 2007 by by private investors, who pledged to raise USD 125 million to pay the construction cost. This sum will also qualify as the "local match" for the extension to Eight Mile Road, to be built by the Detroit Department of Transportation (DDOT).
 
Fort Worth (LRT 1963-2002, Modern Streetcar 2015)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
LRT (line now closed)
1980 System Length
(1.9 km) 1.2 mi
2002
-(1.9) 1.2
Tandy Subway
Tandy Center Complex – Station 3
0.0
 
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning - Modern Streetcar:
2015
+(5.2) 3.2
Fort Worth Streetcar
NE 5th Street – W Magnolia Avenue
(5.2) 3.2
Note: Tandy Center Subway (built as Leonards M&O Subway), opened 1963 February 15, closed 2002 August 30.
Fort Worth Streetcar: initial segment planned to extend N Commerce Street / NE 5th Street – Fort Worth Intermodal Transit Center – S Main Street / W Magnolia Avenue
 
Honolulu (HRT 2012)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning:
2012
+(4.8) 3.0
Honolulu Rail Transit
West Loch – Pearl Highlands
(4.8) 3.0
2013
+(5.6) 3.5
"
East Kapolei – West Loch
(10.5) 6.5
2016
+(5.6) 3.5
"
Pearl Highlands – Aloha Stadium
(16.1) 10.0
2017
+(8.9) 5.5
"
Aloha Stadium – Middle Street
(25.0) 15.5
2019
+(7.3) 4.5
"
Middle Street – Ala Moana Center
(32.3) 20.0
 
Houston (LRT 2004)
Year
Segment Length (km / mi)
Line
Segment
Cumulative System Length   (km / mi)
2004
+(12.1) 7.5
METRORail (Red)
UH-Downtown – Fannin South
(12.1) 7.5
 
Under Construction, Under Design and In Planning:
2014
+(8.5) 5.3
North (Red)
    1. Corridor
Northline Transit Center
 – UH-Downtown
(20.6) 12.8
"
+(9.8) 6.1
Southeast (Purple)
Corridor
Smith – Bastrop – Palm Center
(30.5) 18.9
"
+(5.3) 3.3
East End (Green)
Corridor
Bastrop – Magnolia Transit Center
(35.8) 22.2
-
+(18.2) 11.3
University (Blue)
Corridor
Hillcroft Transit Center – Newcastle
 – Wheeler – UH Central
 – Eastwood Transit Center
(54.0) 33.5
-
+(7.6) 4.7
Uptown (Gold)
Corridor
Bellaire – Northwest Transit Center
(61.6) 38.2
Note: METROrail line opened 2004 January 1 (fare-free until 2004 January 5).
No construction schedule for the University and Uptown lines had been announced at 2010 October.
 
See Part 4 for "Historic Opening Years," Acknowledgments, References and Document History.